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Recalled Premium Edge cat food sickens 21 cats

Premium Edge Cat Food, manufactured by Diamond Pet Food, was recalled in September, but more information was made available today regarding the problem with the cat food.

WASHINGTON — A Missouri company said Tuesday its recalled dried cat food has sickened 21 cats and the pet food was distributed in multiple states in the South and along the East Coast.

Diamond Pet Foods recalled certain bags of Premium Edge Finicky Adult Cat and Premium Edge Hairball cat food in September because they could lead to gastrointestinal or neurological problems for cats. They do not contain enough thiamine, an essential nutrient for cats.

If cats fed these foods have no other source of nutrition, they could develop thiamine deficiency. If untreated, this disorder could result in death, said the Meta, Mo., manufacturer.

The company updated information on the recall on Tuesday, saying it has confirmed 21 reports of thiamine deficiency in New York and Pennsylvania and the pet food was distributed in 18 states altogether. These states include Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New Jersey, Maryland, Delaware, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Alabama, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia and Florida.

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For a full refund, consumers can return the recalled cat food to the place it was purchased. For more information, consumers can call 800-977-8797.

Read the rest of Recalled cat food sickens 21 cats from the Associated Press.

 

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Study shows pet supplements lacking

Testing by ConsumerLab.com shows that many pet supplements don’t contain as much of the medicines they claim.

Arthritis supplements bought by millions of pet owners for their dogs, cats and horses sometimes skimp on the ingredients the makers claim can help aching paws and aging joints, and some contain high amounts of lead, an independent laboratory found.

Four of the six joint supplements for animals tested by ConsumerLab.com lacked the amounts of glucosamine or chondroitin promised on their labels or had other flaws, such as lead. Wider testing by a trade group of 87 brands found that one-quarter fell short.

Over-the-counter dietary supplements for humans do not have to be proven safe or effective before they are sold, and pills for pets get even less scrutiny.

“There is and there always has been” a quality problem, although many companies do a good job, said Mark Blumenthal of the American Botanical Council, which tracks research on herbal products.

Even when these supplements contain what they claim, there is little evidence that they work, veterinary experts say. A large government study of people with arthritis found that glucosamine and chondroitin did no better than dummy pills in easing mild pain. Testing these supplements on pets is more difficult.

The Associated Press has the rest of Tests reveal some pet supplements skimp on meds.

 

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